Wednesday, January 15, 2014

Did You Know? Google Image Search Tools

Image is CC licensed
Did you know that Google recently updated its Google Image Search features?  Now, you can simply perform a Google Image Search and click the "Search Tools" button to access Image Search Tools such as Usage Rights and many more.

How it Works

Before Google made this update, users had to click on the Settings icon and select Advanced Search icon when performing a Google Search in order to access additional features, such as changing the Usage Rights of images.  This feature was practically hidden, therefore it was not used as much.  Now, with this new update, I am hoping that more teachers and students begin to use these additional Image Search Tools to ensure that they are not infringing on any copyright laws.

There are four simple steps that you need to complete in order to use the Image Search Tools correctly.

  1. Visit www.google.com and perform a Google Search.
  2. Click on "Images" after you perform your search
  3. Select the "Search Tools" button to the right of the search bar. 
  4. Select "Usage Rights" or any other Image Search Tool that is available.
     


You could also perform a simple shortcut to the first step by simply clicking on the Images button on Google's Home Page.  This will take you straight to a Google Image Search




Here's an Example

Let's say (hypothetically) that I wanted to find an image that was free to use, share or modify for this blog post.  I might perform a Google Image Search for "magnification instruments" and change my Usage Rights, Image Search Tool, to "Labeled for commercial reuse with modification". Then, I would find the picture that I wanted to use, upload it to my blog post, and cite the image with a proper attribution.   




Well, if you couldn't tell already by the first image I used for this blog post, I guess this wasn't so "hypothetical" after all.


Now that you know
  1. The next time you need to perform a Google Image Search, consider using the Search Tools button to find an image that's Creative Commons licensed
  2. How might you integrate this new tool into one of your lessons?  How might you teach your students about Copyright?


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